Podcast episodes

Episode #12: Working-class writers – voices to be heard

Working-class writers or from those with disadvantaged backgrounds are underrepresented in the publishing world. Amplifying voices and hearing stories from working-class backgrounds is vital so that everyone can gain insight into authentic experiences that are different from their own, helping to shift negative narratives. It is also crucial to open the world of publishing to everyone, regardless of the connections or financial means that they have to support their writing.

In this episode, we speak with two incredible writers who identify as working-class writers and have published widely in the form of novels, short stories and poetry. Mahsuda Snaith speaks to us from Leicester in the UK where she is currently working on her third fiction novel. Natasha Carthew is from rural Cornwall where she champions ‘wild writing’ and is directing the new Working Class Writers Festival. Mahsuda and Natasha share their insights on the importance of greater representation of working class writers, barriers that they face in getting published and exciting initiatives to change that around.

The Working Class Writers Festival will be held from 21-24 October 2021 in Bristol. A website will be up soon, in the meantime follow their Twitter account for updates.

For some amazing reads, check out Mahsuda’s novels ‘The Things We Thought We Knew’ about a British-Bangladeshi girl in chronic pain growing up on a council estate and ‘How To Find Home’ about a young woman negotiating homelessness. Also dive into Natasha’s captivating poetry and her novel ‘All Rivers Run Free’ about a young woman going on a journey to escape an abusive relationship. Her new novel ‘Born Between Crosses’ will be out in April 2021.

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